Breaking Compliance News Blog

Compliance lessons from recent fraud cases

Posted by Scott Gima on 7/20/22 9:15 AM

 

Outlier billing patterns will get you noticed!

A New York ENT physician was convicted of filing false claims with Medicare and Medicaid. The physician submitted claims totaling about $585,000 to Medicare and Medicaid and was paid roughly $191,000.

The fraudulent act was upcoding of ear exams or ear wax removal to an incision procedure of the external ear. An analysis of Medicare and Medicaid data identified this physician’s billing was an outlier and was found to be the highest biller for this procedure in the State of New York. 

Compliance lesson: Enforcement agencies are actively using data analytics to identify, investigate and prosecute providers with unusual billing activity – and so should you. Audit your claims regularly to identify potential false claims, so they can be corrected and/or reported.

 

Mole billing fraud scheme totals $4.1 million in false claims over 7 years

The second case involves a Chicago physician who conducted cancer screenings on moles that were removed from his patients. The US Attorney’s office in the Northern District of Illinois recently filed charges in the US District Court in Chicago. The press release includes the allegation that the physician removed more moles from patients than was medically necessary, totaling $4.1 million in fraudulent payments between 2015 and 2021.

But how does a simple case of removing one mole but billing for removing multiple moles leads to $4.1 million? Well, it turns out that the scheme was, shall we say, creative. Here is what was included in the charge document:

  • More moles were removed that were medically necessary
  • If multiple moles were removed from one area of the body, false documentation would be created to indicate that the moles were removed from different areas of the body
  • When multiple moles were removed from a patient, the specimens would not be submitted immediately to pathology
  • The practice would instead submit one specimen at a time to pathology on different days
  • False documentation was created to show the removal of a single mole on different visits
  • Some of the fraudulent visits were submitted on days when the physician was out of town
  • Fraudulent documentation was submitted in response to Medicare audits

That is how you collect $4.1 million in false claims over a seven-year period.

Compliance Lesson: Examples like this fall into the category of “truth is stranger than fiction.” It is impossible to draft policies and train staff on for every possible compliance risk scenario. The goal of an effective compliance program is to train employees and staff to trust their instincts – if something does not seem right, notify the compliance officer directly or anonymously.

 

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Topics: Penalties and Enforcement, Billing and Claims Submission

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